Lunch Break :: April 19, 2011

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Lunch Break is a short round-up of favorite webcomics appearing here each weekday at noon. Here’s something for you to enjoy over your lunch break or whenever. The premise is simple: it’s another day on the internet. Here’s a new or forgotten comic that seems interesting.

We’d love to have you guest edit Lunch Break!  Check out the Contribute page for more information.

  1. Day 1: MoCCA by Pascal Girard // April 18, 2011
  2. Dr. Ghostenstein Adventures Presents the Mysterious Skeleton by Zander Cannon // October 2009
  3. Cyanide & Happiness by Kris, Rob, Matt and Dave // March 5, 2005
  4. Crime World #1 by David King // 2009
  5. Sleep Styles by Laura Park // May 14, 2008

Sarah Morean

Lunch Break 12.23.10

Categories:  Lunch Break
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lunchbreak_graphic_1

Lunch Break is a short round-up of favorite webcomics appearing here each weekday at noon. Here’s something for you to enjoy over your lunch break or whenever. The premise is simple: it’s another day on the internet. Here’s a new or forgotten comic that seems interesting. Have something to recommend? Email us: crosshatchdispatch@gmail.com.

  1. Serial Typist by Kevin Cannon // ~ May 2010
  2. A Walk With My Double by David King // October 2010
  3. “When Janitors Die” from Toothpaste For Dinner by Drew // 02.19.2005
  4. Climate Change by Darryl Cunningham // December 13, 2010
  5. Sleeping Together by Julia Wertz // June 7, 2006

Sarah Morean

Danny Dutch by David King

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Danny Dutch
by David King
Sparkplug Comic Books

daduDavid King has created a book in which the art and dialogue unite almost at random.  It’s a kind of comics poetry, and it’s done well.

The “av” elements spend most of their time on the page like twins separated at birth — alike and related, but with personalities completely informed by their disparate environments and experiences.

The art is g-g-g-gorgeous.  King’s little characters, with their miniature limbs and classic, but over-the-top hairstyles and outfits, are easy to spend time with.

There’s no real plot, just a current of ache that moves through the book. The characters wear bewildered expressions, lack confidence, and almost treat each other like objects in a room passing time rather than as friends or lovers.  It lays a strange mood on the reader, and even though I’ve re-read this book enough times to know what that mood is, I can’t quite put a finger on it.  It’s really unique.

I’ve seen people try without success to reach this level of dull malaise, but in Danny Dutch, King is the first cartoonist I’ve seen in awhile who really nails it.

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