Guest Strip: Chuck Forsman

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_clubfttzIn 2008, Chuck Forsman graduated from The Center for Cartooning Studies.  Soon after, he won the prestigious Ignatz award for his outstanding series Snake Oil, which is up to its third issue.

Unable to resist the charm of White River Junction, Forsman still lives in Vermont, and will make you a sandwich if you’re lucky.

You can look for his comics in the new Awesome 2: Awesomer anthology published by Indie Spinner Rack and Top Shelf.

You can also catch him this year at TECAF, MECAF, MoCCA, HeroesCon, and SPX.

Prevously, his mini-comic Snake Oil #1 was reviewed by the Cross Hatch HERE.

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Pockmarked Apocalypse #1 by Jeff Lok

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Pockmarked Apocalypse #1
by Jeff Lok
American Stronghold

There’s something funny about the Center for Cartooning Studies. What others might call a book, a project, or even more accurately a portfolio, CCS dubs a thesis. A thesis? Really?

Completion of the CCS thesis does not require research or compare/contrast methodology, like so many theses before it. There is no written requirement, such as a purpose of intent, to accompany the body of work each student presents for review at the end of the school year. On its own, the CCS thesis is a solid testament to all that the students learn at the school, but it’s still not a thesis in the classic sense. I’d like to applaud them on creatively pushing the envelope on academia, but my five-month devotion to patriarchal, dead theologians resulting in a 16-page essay on the concept of Utopian idealism – you know, a real thesis – makes me feel a little more than indignant at the implication that a single issue of a comic book is, on its own, a thesis. The mind of academia is not yet so broad that it can overlook the textbook definition of “thesis” – and what CCS calls a thesis is, in fact of Webster’s, a senior project or portfolio piece. There. I’ve said it. And now that the demon of umbrage has been exorcised, it’s time to talk about Jeff Lok’s lovely first issue of Pockmarked Apocalypse.

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