Interview: Joshua Cotter Pt. 2 [of 2]

Categories:  Interviews
Tags: , , , ,

Skyscrapers of the Midwest is a book about talking cats, and robots, and menacing squid-like creatures—it’s also one of the year’s most powerful and intensely person. For author Joshua Cotter, the creation of the book was as much an act of personal catharsis as anything else.

The personal touches that fill the story—ostensibly a memoir of a small boy growing up in a creatively stifling small town in the Midwest—along with Cotter’s extensive use of fantasy to help tackle some of the more personally difficult issues he takes on, help separate the book from the droves of coming of age stories that have popped up in the world of sequential art.

In this second and final part of our interview with Cotter, we discuss the role of these therapeutic sessions both personally and in terms of the creative process, and how a piece of art so intensely personal can be simultaneously universal.

[Part One]
Read the rest of this entry »

Interview: Joshua Cotter Pt. 1 [of 2]

Categories:  Interviews
Tags: , , , ,

Despite a cast made up largely of talking cats and giant robots, and perpetually blurred lines between the real and the fantastic, Skyscrapers of the Midwest has proven to be one of the most truthful coming of age stories to hit the world of sequential art in some time. It’s dark, brutal, sad, and on occasion, even hopeful, which is to say, it’s a lot like being a kid.

Set in a rural Midwestern farming town, not unlike the one where author Joshua Cotter grew up, it’s not all that surprising to discover that one of the driving factors in the creation of the book was a sense of catharsis from the small town life the artist has since left behind.

Now complete and collected in a hard cover volume by Ad House, Cotter finally seems to have sufficient distance from the Eisner nominated series.
Read the rest of this entry »