Return to ComicSpace.com

Categories:  News

Somewhere in the back of my hipster brain an alarm went off.  Seemed like ComicSpace.com (someone’s answer to MySpace.com back in its heyday) had been silent too long.  It was due for a comeback.  Or something.

Checked the site today and look what I found:

comicspace

ComicSpace.com as it appears today

What could this mean? And do you care?

I began revisiting the site on July 15, 2010, after trying to find some information on a Guest Strip artist that would help shape his bio. (MJ, quoted below, if you must know. Look for his Guest Strip on Friday.)

comicspace_sarah

ComicSpace.com/smorean as it appeared on July 15, 2010

Apparently, I hadn’t logged in for about three years. Go figure.

After joining in December 2006, it took me about seven months to realize I didn’t know what to do on that site, so I left. Not for any other thing — there wasn’t and still isn’t much competition for ComicSpace as an online social network strictly for cartoonists — but it just wasn’t fulfilling for me. And for many others, I learned, as I clicked through my freinds’ abandoned profiles.  ComicSpace had become a wasteland.  Its most recent user on that date had signed up months ago and I really wondered what that person would find to do on there.

Here are some quick responses from active and inactive ComicSpace users about their experience with the site:

Box Brown:

I am currently owed at least 4 months of ad revenue from comicspace which took over my ads on boxbrown.com a few years back.  They are giving me the runaround and want nothing more than to see them fail.

Comicspace as a whole?  I’ve never figured out any real way to use the site.

Will Dinski:

I only used ComicSpace the first month or so when it was active. I didn’t even know it was down. I don’t use it anymore, really.

I wasn’t sure if maybe other people were still using it. So I keep my comics there in case anyone is interested in reading them.

MJ:

Over all I have made quite a few contacts, as for an audience not so much. Really geared towards comic book field. So if you aren’t creating comic books the contact angle is probably not a viable resource for an audience angle I see no use for it.

I use it weekly to keep up with fellow comic book creators.

Yes they are switching over to a WordPress format. You are able to use all the features WordPress offers albeit you have to upgrade for some features. But all the normal Bells and Whistles are there. I am not sure what else will be available as they are down right now for the upgrade. I was disappointed that ComicSpace allowed so much spam, and it seemed like there was nothing really being done about it. I use it to keep in contact with a few fellow comic book artists like Erik Larsen (Savage Dragon) as well as a few others to see what they are doing, and to post bulletins for projects I’m involved with. Like I mentioned earlier this was geared towards the comic book market creators, and a great place to reach those that create comics.

The actual usefullness for making contacts is great. Especially if you are looking for artists, or writers. But as a place to grab an audience this is not the platform you would want to use. Especially comic strip artists. You will not gain an audience through this venue. We will see what happens when they change over to the new format though, which I am personally not that excited about. I already have enough work to do besides going back into ComicSpace and recoding another WordPress site. I wish they would do something about all that spam that never seems to go away. C’mon if you create comics your in, if not hit the trail. How do you do that? Approval for member requires actual artwork to posted before you are accepted.

Thanks to MJ for illuminating the situation for me.  What I hoped might be a huge overhaul seems to be just a move to a new platform.  Hopefully to shake some bugs out.

It’s too bad, in a way.  ComicSpace was never ideal, but I sort of wish there was a place where cartoonists could gather online and share trade secrets and new artwork that was buzzy and fun like Facebook, but ComicSpace has never made that leap. The best place for cartoonists to gather right now, it seems, is at conventions. Maybe it’s a little old-school, but it’ll do.

Sarah Morean

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